Wednesday, February 06, 2008

Work

Sorry, no work-at-home-Wednesday blog entry; this was another 12-hour day at the office. The latter part of 2007 was pretty quiet and a bit dull but 2008 has been different. So far this year I’ve worked an average of 54 hours a week. A good bit of it is the kind of work that provides immediate gratification or an adrenalin rush – bit addictive. So that's fun, but not the way I want to live, honestly. And not a pace I can keep up much longer.

S. and I are half-way through with the six-day Ethnography Training Course we’re teaching. We’ve had some challenges – primarily in the low numbers, late registrations, and a good bit of fuzziness on why the people who came were there in the first place. So, it’s been hard to know how to serve them. But things are flowing pretty well now and it feels worthwhile.

Right after this is over I fly out to Indiana to teach Perspectives. Fortunately I’m giving a lecture I’ve done more than 50 times.

After that, things should slow down a bit.

6 comments:

Paul Merrill said...

Hopefully you'll get to see the Bennetts while you're in Indiana.

Marti said...

Yup. They got me the invite, and I'll be staying with them while I'm there. Always enjoyable!

Megan Noel said...

where are you going in indiana? is it indianapolis? remember the children's museum we used to go to? there is a huge chihuly there now.. pretty cool. you can walk under it and see it from all the levels. and there is a display for the kids where they can play with replicas of the parts.

Marti said...

Sure I remember, Meg. Yeah, I'll be not far from Indy but not sure about time to hang out in the city proper. We'll see. I forgot they had a bit Chihuly installation there!

Dad said...

In Indiana Indianapolis is referred to as nap-town. I thought you were going to Muncie. Not very close to nap-town, but you'll probably fly into nap-town.

Marti said...

Interesting... this will help me talk like a native! Muncie is one of the places I'm teaching. I haven't looked on a map lately to figure out how far apart they all are.